The 15 Least Popular Dog Breeds in America

Few living things have as high of an approval rating as our canine friends, I think. It’s a well-known fact that they are referred to as “man’s best friend” and that they all attend paradise. Throughout human history, there have been numerous tributes to their loyalty, ranging from Argos in Homer’s Odyssey to Beethoven and Balto in motion pictures.

However, because we are biassed by nature, some of the 195 registered breeds inevitably end up at the bottom. Stacker dissected the 28 least popular dog breed’s in America using data from the American Kennel Club, which was released on March 16, 2021, to help understand what influences our decisions. For comparison, AKC rankings from 2013 were also added.

It goes without saying that a breed’s size, upkeep, allergies, temperament, and disposition all affect its level of popularity in the country. However, brand recognition, or name recognition, is just as important; this is why labradors, retrievers, and bulldogs rank among the most popular breeds every year, while the fourth-least popular breed featured here debuted at the 2020 Westminster Dog Show and is descended from a nomadic West African breed that dates back to prehistoric Saharan times. Accessibility can also be a barrier to popularity; there are fewer respectable breeders of newer or less popular breeds, which reduces your chances of adopting one of the less well-known breeds into your home.

1. Scottish deerhound

– 2020 registration position: #166 out of 195 breeds, highest
– 2013 registration rank: #165 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -1

Although the Scottish deerhound is a fairly amiable dog, they are best kept as solitary companions because they enjoy a good chase. The ideal homes for this elegant breed are those with only one dog and no small children.

2. Plott hound

– 2020 registration position: #167 out of 195 breeds, highest
– 2013 registration rank: #149 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -18

The Smoky Mountains are the breeding ground for this all-American breed. These exceptional trackers were bred by descendants of German immigrant Johannes George Plott. Because they need constant training and have a special affection for kids, plott hounds are best suited for experienced dog owners. With a strong leader, these dogs can make wonderful family companions.

3. Norwegian buhund

– 2020 registration rank: #168 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: #166 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -2

An ancient breed, the Norwegian buhund is referred to as the dog of the Vikings. The dog’s history riding shotgun with the Vikings is a bit misleading, however, since there’s nothing more the modern-day versions would rather do than simply hang out at home with their human companions.

4. Glen of Imaal terrier

– Out of 195 breeds, 2020 registration rank is #169.
– 2013 registration rank: #167 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -2

These tiny puppies might not have been born if not for the Irish Rebellion. When Queen Elizabeth gave the Flemish land for helping her squash an Irish uprising in the late 1500s, the men brought their hounds with them. These adorable fluffballs were the product of those hounds mating with Irish dogs. Though they might be too strong for very young children to play with, they make wonderful family pets.

5. Irish red and white setter

– Out of 195 breeds, 2020 registration rank: #170 highest
– 2013 registration rank: #145 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -25

Irish setters mature more slowly than most dogs, so they hold onto their puppy spirit for longer. That means that even though they make excellent hunters (and calm, loyal family dogs), setters may require patience when training—especially as they can reach 75 pounds.

6. Ibizan hound

– 2020 registration rank: #171 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: #151 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -20

Even though Ibizan hounds were once owned by Egyptian pharaohs, your less-than-royal home won’t be out of place for them. These athletic dogs make wonderful companions; just make sure they get enough exercise to exhaust them.

#24. Sussex spaniel
REBECCAASHWORTH / SHUTTERSTOCK

7. Sussex spaniel

– Out of 195 breeds, 2020 registration rank: #172 highest
– Out of 177 breeds, 2013 registration rank: #162 highest
– Change since 2013: -10

With good cause, Sussex spaniels are talkative breeds. The athletic, well-mannered dogs are usually between 13 and 15 inches tall, thanks to their short legs, which keep them low to the ground. To let hunters know where they are, they bark and make other noises.

8. Bergamasco sheepdog

– 2020 registration rank: #173 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: unranked

These sheepdogs require regular brushing due to their instantly recognisable long, curly coats. For active families with large yards, this Italian breed is ideal if you’re up for the challenge.

9. Irish water spaniel

– Out of 195 breeds, 2020 registration rank: #174 highest
– 2013 registration rank: #141 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -33

Of all the spaniel breeds, the Irish water spaniel is the tallest. These dogs have water-repellent fur and are skilled swimmers. Though they originated as working dogs, Irish water spaniels are renowned for being blatantly silly.

10. Polish lowland sheepdog

– 2020 registration position: #175 out of 195 breeds, highest
– Ranking at registration in 2013: #157 out of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -18

A true breed hero is the Polish lowland sheepdog. It is said that during World War II, Psyche, a Polish lowland, could sense when bombs were about to fall on Warsaw. These puppies are very trainable and eager to please, and they are happiest when they have jobs.

#20. Otterhound
LOURDES PHOTOGRAPHY / SHUTTERSTOCK

11. Otterhound

– 2020 registration rank: #176 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: #172 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -4

Less than 350 otterhounds are believed to exist in the United States at the moment, and as few as 600 may exist globally. Because of their even temperaments and amiable personalities, these dogs make excellent pets, but they need to have their thick double coats brushed at least once a week.

12. Dog Breed: Kuvaszok

– Out of 195 breeds, 2020 registration rank: #177 highest
– 2013 registration rank: #150 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -27

This breed originated in Hungary and was selected by King Matthias I. More than anyone in his court, the troubled king is said to have trusted his beloved Kuvasz.

13. Komondor

– 2020 registration rank: #178 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: #159 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -19

The fact that a komondor‘s fur resembles a mop terribly much cannot be avoided. Their coats serve as a form of camouflage, allowing them to blend in with sheep and surprise any wolves that approach too closely, which is a good explanation for why.

#17. Cirneco dell'Etna
DRAGONIKA / SHUTTERSTOCK

14. Cirneco dell’Etna

– 2020 registration rank: #179 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: unranked

This ancient breed was officially recognised by the AKC in 2015. Its name literally translates to “dog of Cyrene (Libya).” These nimble canines have exceptional hunting instincts, particularly with regard to rabbits.

15. Pharaoh hound

– 2020 regidtration rank: #180 highest of 195 breeds
– 2013 registration rank: #160 highest of 177 breeds
– Change since 2013: -20

The national dog of Malta is also well-liked in the US. The energetic breed needs a tall fence to prevent straying since it is an excellent rabbit hunter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *